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Art Movements

This week in art news: the $10 million reward for solving the Gardner Museum heist was set to expire without eliciting new clues, five works by Hans Hofmann missing for more than a decade were recovered, and a four-story mural of a penis was painted over.

The empty frame where Rembrandt's "The Storm on the Sea of Galilee" (1633) once hung at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (photo courtesy the FBI, via Wikimedia Commons)
The empty frame where Rembrandt’s “The Storm on the Sea of Galilee” (1633) once hung at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (photo courtesy the FBI, via Wikimedia Commons)

Art Movements is a weekly collection of news, developments, and stirrings in the art world. Subscribe to receive these posts as a weekly newsletter.

Tipsters who have information about the 1990 Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist have just two more days to come forward and collect the $10 million reward being offered by the institution. On and after January 1, 2018, the reward will be a mere $5 million.

Five paintings by the Abstract Expressionist Hans Hofmann that went missing in 2003 were recovered by Art Recovery International.

A four-story mural of a penis by artist Carolina Falkholt on Manhattan’s Lower East Side was painted over. It had been commissioned by the New Allen, an art foundation run by a Peruvian restaurant that apparently had not secured the permission of the building’s owner.

After abruptly canceling it, the mayor of Düsseldorf, Thomas Geisel, gave the green light to an exhibition at the city’s Stadtmuseum about Max Stern, a Jewish art dealer who fled the Nazis.

A statue of Klansman Nathan Bedford Forrest along Interstate 65 in Nashville was doused in pink paint. A different statue of the KKK member and Confederate general was recently removed in Memphis.

Archaeologists in eastern Mongolia uncovered what they believe to be the tomb of a Turkic viceroy dating from between 716 and 734 CE.

A rendering of the new Pharos wing of the Museum of Old and New Art (courtesy of Fender Katsalidis Architects)
A rendering of the new Pharos wing of the Museum of Old and New Art (courtesy of Fender Katsalidis Architects)

A new wing opened at the Museum of Old and New Art in Hobart, Tasmania, hosting large-scale works by James Turrell and Richard Wilson.

Researchers in the Netherlands suspect that a rare watercolor purportedly painted by Adolf Hitler is in fact a forgery. An anonymous donor gifted the work to the Netherlands Institute for War Documentation in November.

Five hundred academics signed an open letter criticizing changes being made to the displays at the Museum of the Second World War in Gdansk, Poland. The far-right Law and Justice party has sought to seize control of the institution so it can present the “Polish point of view” on World War II.

In anticipation of the Lunar New Year — which will mark the beginning of the Year of the Dog — a mall in Taiyuan, the capital of Shanxi province in China, unveiled a large statue of a dog that resembles US President Donald Trump.

The Printing Museum in Houston, which has been closed since May of this year, will reopen in January 2018.

Archaeologists clearing the attic of Westminster Abbey came across 30,000 stained glass shards, some of them dating back to the 13th century.

Fans of the X–Men franchise are lobbying for the Canadian city of Fort McMurray, Alberta, to erect a statue of superhero Wolverine in commemoration of a 2016 wildfire that locals nicknamed “The Beast.”

Transactions

Johan Gregor van der Schardt, "A Foot" (ca 1560s–'70s), Italy or Nuremberg, Terracotta, painted and gilded (© Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford)
Johan Gregor van der Schardt, “A Foot” (ca 1560s–’70s), Italy or Nuremberg, Terracotta, painted and gilded (© Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford)

Arts Council England revealed the cultural gifts it had acquired through its Cultural Gifts Scheme and Acceptance in Lieu programs, which allow individuals to pay taxes by donating artworks and historical objects. The works include two sculptures by Anthony Caro, a portrait painted by John Singer Sargent when he was 19, and a very realistic Renaissance sculpture of a foot.

Indiana University’s College of Arts and Sciences received an anonymous gift of $1.5 million to establish the Tanner-Operman Chair position in the Department of Art History. The donation was made in honor of Roy Sieber, a scholar of African art who taught at IU for over 30 years.

A German court ordered publisher Steidl to pay photographer Lawrence Schwartzwald €65,000 (~$77,600) for losing 49 of his prints.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired a 14th-century Hebrew Bible produced in the Spanish region of Castile.

Hebrew Bible produced in the Spanish region of Castile in the first half of the 14th century (courtesy Sotheby's)
Hebrew Bible produced in the Spanish region of Castile in the first half of the 14th century (courtesy Sotheby’s)

Transitions

Rebecca Nagy, the director of the Harn Museum of Art in Gainesville, Florida, will retire in the summer 2018.

Lorenzo Candelaria, currently a professor and associate provost at the University of Texas at El Paso, will be the new dean of Purchase College’s School of the Arts.

Clare Matterson was appointed director of engagement at the Natural History Museum in London.

Susan Moldenhauer, the director of the University of Wyoming Art Museum, retired.

Accolades

Dr. Dorothy Kosinski, the director of the Phillips Collection, was awarded the Order of the Italian Star for her role in promoting Italian culture.

Opportunities

The Art in Public Life residency at the ArtCenter/South Florida is accepting applications through January 22, 2018.

Obituaries

Tim Rollins and KOS, "A Midsummer Night's Dream (After Shakespeare and Mendelssohn)" (2011), Thai mulberry paper, watercolor, acrylic and India inks, collage, mustard seed, offset lithography on paper and canvas, 70 x 80 in (courtesy Studio KOS, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong)
Tim Rollins and KOS, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream (After Shakespeare and Mendelssohn)” (2011), Thai mulberry paper, watercolor, acrylic and India inks, collage, mustard seed, offset lithography on paper and canvas, 70 x 80 in (courtesy Studio KOS, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong)

Don Hogan Charles (1938–2017), photographer. The first African-American staff photographer at the New York Times.

Alfie Curtis (1930–2017), actor. Best known for playing the character of Dr. Evazan in the original Star Wars (1977).

Hubert Damisch (1928–2017), art historian and philosopher.

Bob Givens (1918–2017), animator. Best known for redesigning and popularizing the character of Bugs Bunny.

Tim Rollins (1955–2017), artist. Best known for his work with the collective Kids of Survival (KOS).

Jill Lever (1935–2017), curator and architectural librarian.

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