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Posted inNews

1001 Chairs Protest for Ai Weiwei This Weekend

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has been missing for 12 days without official charge from the Chinese government. In protest, artists and activists all over the world are planning a global sit-in this Sunday, April 17 at 1 pm, staking out Chinese embassies with 1001 Chairs for Ai Weiwei, a take on Ai Weiwei’s 2007 “Fairytale” project in Kassel, Germany.

All over the world, protesters will bring chairs to Chinese embassies and consulates and “sit peacefully” in support of Ai. Spearheaded by New York City’s own Creative Time, the organization writes that “1001 Chairs for Ai Weiwei calls for [Ai’s] immediate release, supporting the right of artists to speak and work freely in China and around the world.” See the event’s Facebook page for details, including gathering places and times all over the world.

Posted inArt

Absence as Food Art

Last Wednesday April 6, Hyperallergic LABS Tumblr editor Janelle Grace and I attended a press preview for a collaboration between artist Paul Ramirez-Jonas and Park Avenue Spring chef Kevin Lasko called Plus One, hosted at the restaurant and presented by Creative Time Consulting. The resulting event was a mix of inspiring flavor combinations, symbolic food choices and a dash of relational aesthetics engagement with dining as experience. Delicious, but also aesthetically thought provoking. Here are both of our takes on the event, plus a photo essay. Bon appetit!

Posted inArt

Marc Horowitz Crowdsources Life/Art From Strangers

On November 1, one of People Magazine‘s Top 50 Hottest Bachelors, conceptual artist and Internet start Marc Horowitz, took a line from Subservient Chicken and let the Internet tell him what to do. He agreed to bound by these decisions, no matter how absurd, and to broadcast the results online for the wider world to see.

For the entire month, with the backing of the New York-based public art organization Creative Time, Marc has been crowdsourcing his life. Everything from what he should wear to how he should celebrate Thanksgiving becomes open to the masses. The piece continues in the tradition of Marc’s extensive body of enormously popular Internet-based works, from “Talkshow 247,” where he broadcast his life continuously for three months, and the “Google Maps Roadtrip,” a journey across the country using only Google Streetview.