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Posted inArt

Cary Leibowitz’s Particular Shade of Pink

Not all shades of pink get equal attention. The glut of carnation pinks, the flood of hot pink, and the surges of magenta in street fashion, web design, and art — well, it adds up to a visual culture that leaves out other shades of pink. Cary Leibowitz’s new solo show (paintings and belt buckles) is exciting for many reasons. But what hits hard first is this rare hue of pink that covers every inch of the walls and coats the paintings’ backgrounds.

Posted inArt

The Death of Context at NADA New York

With the permanent invasion of art fairs into the art world economy like a plague, most galleries, no matter how cutting-edge or avant-garde, seem to believe (whether from actual or perceived necessity) that they must participate in all of the increasingly frequent art fair seasons. This endless stream of fairs forces smaller galleries that show conceptual, abstract, or experimental work into a setting devoid of context, stripping the art of its desired impact or importance. While I’m certainly not the first to point this out, nowhere was it more noticeable recently than at NADA New York.

Posted inArt

LOST on the Lower East Side

From L to R: Marianne Vitale, “Model for Burning Bridge (1)” (2011), reclaimed lumber, 68 x 18 x 22; Yamini Nayar, “Strange Event” (2009), c-print, 30 x 40; Leah Beeferman, “Journey into the unknown machines attempt a construction of the skies” (2010), digital animation with sound (All photos by author) Some people look at the […]

Posted inArt

Angry Art Letters on the Lower East Side

Ridykeulous, founded by artists Nicole Eisenman and A.L. Steiner in 2005, describes itself as an effort to “subvert, sabotage, and overturn the language commonly used to define feminist and lesbian art,” primarily through exhibitions, performances, and zines. Attacking the marginalization of queer and feminist art as “alternative” cultures, they insist upon participating in mainstream dialogues about art and culture; in adopting the role of curators and organizing exhibitions, Steiner and Eisenman forcefully insert themselves and their collaborators into the spaces, both literally and figuratively, of the art establishment. Though not all of the artists in Readykeulous are female, nor do all identify as queer, they share an interest in disrupting the status quo.