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Posted inArt

The Art World Needs Some Shock Therapy

It all started with a write-up on the Gallerist blog about Jordan Eagles’s new show at the Krause Gallery where his blood paintings are currently displayed. I immediately cringed when I went on a journey following all of his press, posts about him on Facebook and Twitter, and real life opinions with real life people. Everyone seemed to be so in awe of paintings made out of blood, finding it so shocking that someone could use such an “unusual” and “disgusting” material to create something so beautiful. All I could do was roll my eyes.

Posted inArt

Deep Inside a Billionaire’s Limo

Hyperallergic writers and siblings Brendan and Marisa Carroll recently attended a screening of David Cronenberg’s Cosmopolis at Walter Reade Theater in New York, which was followed by a Q-and-A session with the director. Here they review the film and tease out the artistic influences that inform Cronenberg’s sinister urban dreamscape.

Posted inArt

Art, Life, Commercialism and Sexism in the New York School: Regina Bogat’s Story

Painter Regina Bogat has been involved the New York art world since the 1950s. (I promised not to reveal her age.) She had her first solo exhibition in the city in 1956, at Terrain Gallery, and her most recent one, Stars, which features colorful, vigorously messy paintings of different variations on the shape, is currently on view at Williamsburg’s Art 101. I had never heard of Bogat before this exhibition, nor seen her art, as I suspect many people haven’t. Who knows how many under-recognized women artists have been lost to the male-centric narrative of art history?

Posted inArt

Manhattan Cathedral Explores Water in Art

If you’re near Columbia University, there’s an art show that sounds worthwhile exploring and it’s devoted to water. The Cathedral of St. John, which has long had an established art program, is tackling the topic of H2O in their current art show that features some major artists, including Jenny Holzer, William Kentridge, Robert Longo and Mark Rothko, alongside lesser known talents. The works are presented in the bays of the nave, in various chapels, and along the walls of the Great Crossing.

Posted inOpinion

Required Reading

This week, architect Frank Lloyd Wright talks about the corner window, which he says is “an idea conceived early in my work that the box is a fascist symbol,” the mess that Mark Rothko’s suicide created, the first signs of street art about the UK riots, discovering work from the master of correspondence art, even the treat of death won’t deter copyright infringement, Doris Salcedo on memory in art, more detailed plans for Apple’s new HQ and a geographically accurate map of the London tube.

Posted inOpinion

Required Reading

This week… the Rothko Chapel at 40, artists and their audiences, Ai Weiwei 25 yrs ago, ageism & photographers, honeybees & humans design together, the commerce of fan art, Tintoretto at the Venice Biennale, AIDS at 30, IBM & the Met collaborate to preserve art, Kickstarter is the 3rd largest comic book publisher in America.

Posted inArt

Visual Treats at DC’s Phillips Collection

Washington, DC is a great museum town. During my dozen or so trips over the years I have yet to see all the Smithsonian institutions so I didn’t feel the need to ventured far from The Mall for my art fix. This time I avoided the Smithsonian all together and headed for one situated in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of the city, The Phillips Collection. This jewel box of modern art — and not soo modern — avoids -isms so you ended up encountering the art of 19th C. America to 20th C. France or 17th C. Spain in just a few steps.