Subscribe to our newsletter

Get the latest news, reviews, and commentary delivered directly to your inbox. Every weekday.

Posted inOpinion

Picasso Biographer Weighs In On Le Guennec Picassos

John Richardson, the art historian who has written (and is still writing) the definitive Picasso biography, has published his thought on Vanity Fair‘s website on the recently discovered Picassos in the possession of Pierre Le Guennec, Picasso’s electrician. He writes, “Picasso would never, in my opinion, have given away these works — so relevant to his early development — not even to his wife.” [Vanity Fair]

Posted inNews

Raiders of the Lost Art

Reuters reports that, “A new online database recording more than 20,000 works of art looted by the Nazis from Jews in France and Belgium during World War Two shows that at least half have yet to be returned to their original owners.”

To view the database, where you will find works by Salvador DaliPablo PicassoHenri MatisseEdouard Manet, and almost every other master from the era, go to www.errproject.org/jeudepaume.

There are some fascinating photos on the Daily Mail website that show the extent of the looting that took place.

Posted inArt

When Modernism Ruled Europe

Between World War I and II, there was a strong gust of classicism that swept through the Western European avant-garde. Artists from across the continent embraced the language of the ancients as a way to reflect their own time and culture. This taste for antique forms can be interpreted in many different ways, including as an attempt to seek order in a tumultuous time, a way to cloak a modern ideology with powerful symbols, or a reaction to the radicalism of the previous decades. Regardless of the root cause or causes, the style that was at once familiar and dignified was a rich source of inspiration for artists, designers, and architects of all types.

This odd chapter in modern art is the subject of the Guggenheim Museum’s current exhibition Chaos and Classicism: Art in France, Italy, and Germany, 1918–1936, which is a very attractive exhibition that gathers together a remarkable array of objects associated with almost every -ism from the era. The power of classicism is partly due to its malleability and how it was able to lend its voice to any and every modern movement that sought refuge in its silhouettes, drapery, linear logic, and airs of history.

Posted inArt

At Prague’s Veletrzni Palac

Prague itself is like a museum, where contemporary architectural gems are situated next to old landmarks. It’s an embarrassment of riches. One day we walked through Prague’s 10th century castle district, then went down the hill a couple of blocks to find a Frank Gehry-designed office complex, and continued throughout the city to see Baroque, Gothic, Art Nouveau, and Cubist buildings. But if you had to visit just one Prague museum, it would have to be the Veletrzni Palac (Fair Trade Palace), a truly massive collection of Czech and European work originally built in 1925 for trade fairs.

Posted inNews

An Extensive Roundup of Haitian Art in Jeopardy, London ICA’s Budget Crisis

… Florida’s Dail Museum needs money to complete its new building … a woman fell into a Rose Period Picasso last Friday at the Met and ignited some of the funniest blog comments I’ve ever read on a New York Times blog (don’t worry, both the woman & the Picasso will be fine) … Toronto’s Art Gallery of Ontario receives its biggest contemporary art donation ever … and a list of all the biennials you can look forward to in 2010.

{"cart_token":"","hash":"","cart_data":""}