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Posted inNews

NYT Goes Museums, Hosts Twitter Chat [LIVEBLOG]

In the mood for some museum news? You’re in luck, because the New York Times has more than you could EVER READ. Their annual special “Museums Section” was just published, and we sorted it for you. Check out a selected list of their stories here, plus stay tuned for an NYT Twitter chat this afternoon about museums and social media. [UPDATE] We have a collection of the best tweets from the #nytmuseums conversation in this liveblog.

Posted inOpinion

Does Anyone Actually Like Crowd-Sourced Shows?

When I heard about the Smithsonian’s upcoming video game exhibition, I was filled with a sense of dread upon reading the press release’s bolded title: “Smithsonian American Art Museum Invites Public to Vote on Games to be Featured in “The Art of Video Games” Exhibition”. They tout the voting like it’s something to be proud of, but honestly, I am totally sick of crowd-sourced shows. For how historically unsuccessful they have been, crowd-sourced shows seem to be written up as critical novelties, and then recycled throughout the art and museum world. The novelty is way past over.

Posted inArt

James Gilbert On Tweeted, Googled and Inappropriately Touched

Los Angeles-based artist James Gilbert has been exploring the nature of privacy online with Tweeted, Googled and Inappropriately Touched. The cleverly named series incorporates smaller sub-projects, like “Privacy Is Dead Because We Said So, 2.0” (2010), which is included in #TheSocialGraph.

As part of the Brooklyn incarnation, Gilbert asks participants who would like to take one of the hundred hand-sewn plastic undergarments home to agree to the following conditions, including promising not to sell them, to post a photo with them online on some form of social media, and to send us the link. The images we’ve received (and posted on our tumblelog) portray everything from the very mundane shots of people holding them up to the definitely NSFW (see images here).

Posted inArt

Jennifer Dalton Talks Social Media Consumption

This is the second in a series of interviews with artists, writers, and personalities involved with #TheSocialGraph, which opens today (November 12, 6-9p). For more information, visit hyperalleric.com/thesocialgraph.

Jennifer Dalton stepped right into the heart of New York’s social media art movements when she, along with artist William Powhida, organized #Class at the Winkleman Gallery earlier this year. The exhibition was as much a social media event producing a constant stream of Facebook content, Twitter conversations, livestreams, and Flickr images, as a IRL one.

Since then she has completed “What Are We Not Shutting Up About? (Five Months of Status Updates and Responses from Jerry Saltz’s Facebook [Profile] Page)” (2010), which she exhibited this past summer at the FLAG Art Foundation. I interviewed her in July about that social media profile turned art work and she talked about the reasons she makes art …

Posted inNews

“All Your Tweet Are Belong to Us” — @librarycongress

First MoMA acquires “@” and now the Library of Congress (aka @librarycongress) is acquiring every tweet since March 2006. It’s always great to see institutions look past the monetary value of things and elevate the bonds we all share. So, next time someone luddite asks you “Who do you think is interested in what you had for breakfast?” You can confidently respond, “The Library of Congress, asshole!”