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Posted inArt

My Very Personal Beat Nite in Photos, Part 2

… Half the night was already over and we had the daunting task of seeing the other spaces in the midst of all the buzz of Beat Nite with only a few hours left. Art hopping in Bushwick isn’t always easy. With no real density of art spots, you end up darting around the neighborhood by foot or train. Sure there are surprises along the way but all I could wonder as we wandering through seemingly abandoned blocks was “is this what Soho felt like decades ago when it was mostly abandoned buildings and industrial spaces?” On a map Bushwick always looks more compact than it feels like on the ground.

Posted inOpinion

Swoon’s First Community Center Inaugurated in Haiti

Last week, the “first real inauguration of the [Konbit Shelter] community center with workshops and events brought by Ayiti Resurrect and Ayiti Cherie Healing” took place in Bigones, Haiti. Spearheaded by Brooklyn-based artist Swoon, the Konbit Shelter Project was created with the idea that a group of artists, engineers, architects, and builders could pool their individual knowledge, resources, and time to make a lasting difference in post-earthquake Haiti. [Konbit Shelter blog]

Posted inNews

Swoon Getting Up in New Orleans

Photographer and art historian John D’Addario has been capturing images of the new Swoon pieces going up in the Crescent City. Judging by the designs she has big plans for the city, oh right, she’s planning an art house on Piety Street! And not just any house but a “towering pixie temple with a star-shaped floor plan, a zigzag wrap-around porch and pointy cupola, adorned with assorted dormers and flying filigree.” It sounds impressive.

Posted inOpinion

The Underbelly Project Wants to Create an “Underground”

Unbeknown to the vast majority of New Yorkers, a street art project has quietly been taking place under the streets of our fair city, artist by artist and flashlight by flashlight. The Underbelly Project is a reaction against the overwhelming commercialization of street art. Project organizers Workhorse and PAC called the fad for ripping off street objects “commercialism at its worst.” To rectify this supposed “commercial” situation being faced by street artists, Underbelly “safeguards” street art’s “integrity” by placing it where only the select few can get at it: in an abandoned, unused subway stations somewhere underneath the teeming pavement.

Posted inArt

Swoon’s Konbit Shelter: Every Disaster Holds the Promise of Creation

Two Konbit Shelter project team members, Thaddeus Pawlowski and Sarah Walko, reflect on the nature of disasters and what they can teach us about how we become who we are. As they explain, “They reveal deep patterns in our nature. Artists are vital to the rebuilding process because they can help us recognize these patterns and the lessons embedded within them. By fostering a common vision and purpose, they can glue a city back together even more than housing and infrastructure, as they provide a psychic infrastructure.”

Posted inArt

Review of Banksy’s “Exit Through the Gift Shop”

As a film, Exit Through the Gift Shop is funny, interesting, and quirky, but you don’t walk away feeling like you experienced a film as much as a really long DIY online video. Some parts are very compelling, and there are some real laughs, but the movie often drags, making you wish you could fast forward to the good parts.

Posted inArt

Art World Ikeas

A new generation of websites selling prints by contemporary artists are emerging as the Ikeas of the art world — they sell editions, from large to small runs, of different kinds of work, from traditional prints to paintings and drawings. At high volume and low prices, these sites make the most of their populist position: buying art need not be hard!

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