Posted inNews

UK’s Controversial Declassification of Crafting as a Creative Industry

A proposed declassifying of crafting as a creative industry in the UK has the the country’s cavalcade of craft makers bristling. The broadly and ridiculously named Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) released a paper in late April directed at evaluating the creative industries, including the elimation of “crafts” as one of the accepted creative industries categories.

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Zaha Hadid’s Candid Critique on Misogyny Against Female Architects

Responding to a research on discrimination against women architects, Zaha Hadid, one of the top female architects and the first woman to be honored with the Pritzker Prize (an incredibly prestigious award in the industry), has stated that she herself experienced difficulties in working in the United Kingdom. In an interview with the Observer, she stated: “It is easier for me in European countries than it is here [in London]. There is a different dynamic. In the UK it is more difficult. They are very conservative. There is a skepticism and more misogynist behaviour here. Although, while there were people against me, there were also people living here who were incredibly supportive.”

Posted inArt

The Relationship Between Science and Art, Explored Through Laboratory Architecture

BRIGHTON, UK — Tucked behind an aging mews of terraced houses in the historic city of Cambridge is a hidden modernist science facility. Negotiating tight security and an immaculate grey gravel drive, expectations climb as you approach an understated entrance in a warm yet sleek façade. The straight lines inspire; a horizontal accent calms. The building has also been sunk a little to root the botanical research lab in the present. If you ever held childhood aspirations toward being a scientist, this structure is designed to revive those dreams before you even cross the threshold.

Posted inArt

Jean Dubuffet’s Lasting Legacy

BRIGHTON, U.K. — Perhaps it is little wonder the last time Jean Dubuffet was reviewed in a public gallery in the United Kingdom, the year was 1966 and the decade was swinging. The French painter’s love of raw creativity was of a piece with the social revolutions taking place. His invention of Art Brut was perhaps the rough, raw yin to Pop art’s glossy yang.

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The (Other) Sleep Artist

In a crowded marketplace, and especially during uncertain economic times, how can artists stand out from the pack? It helps to be a child prodigy or a former model or a convicted serial murderer, of course, but it’s not like you can just wake up in the morning and become any of these things. Welsh artist Lee Hadwin, however, has been lucky enough to distinguish himself by doing something the rest of us do every day: he’s been making a name for himself as the artist who paints in his sleep.