Events

Three Powerfully Political Shows Open at the California African American Museum

The California African American Museum kicks off its exhibition cycle this Wednesday with shows about the 1992 LA Uprising and historical disappearance of African-American women.

Derrick Adams in front of “Fabrication Station #4” (2016) (photo by Andy Romer, via caamuseum.org)

The California African American Museum (CAAM) kicks off its spring exhibition cycle this Wednesday with Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop!, an evening of art, food trucks, and DJ sets from Ms. Jck Dvy and DJ PFUNK.

Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, “The Evanesced #107” (2016), India ink and watercolor on recycled, acid-free paper, 12 x 9 inches (© Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, Courtesy of the artist and Jenkins Johnson Gallery, via caamuseum.org)

The exhibitions opening include new work by contemporary artists, as well as reconsiderations of historical events. On the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the 1992 LA UprisingNo Justice, No Peace: LA 1992, examines the causes and legacies of this pivotal event through photography, video, posters, and other archival material. Derrick Adams: Network marks this New York-based artist’s first museum show in Southern California. Through collage, video, installation, and performance, Adams explores television’s considerable influence on our lives, mining televised images of African-Americans, ranging from Sanford and Son to Oprah Winfrey and O.J. Simpson. On Wednesday evening, Adams will also be presenting “On,” a live reenactment of infomercials, the audio of which will be mixed and adjusted on-site by the artist.

Finally, Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle: The Evanesced features expressionistic portraits that the artist created while dancing to blues, hip-hop, and club music, conjuring up a centuries-long pattern of the disappearance of African-American women, either through slavery, trafficking, or contemporary violence. On April 27, Hinkle will stage an accompanying performance in the gallery, titled “Embodied Disappearance,” that aims to give physical form to this troubling history.

Admission is free, but RSVP is requested here or by calling (213)-744-2024.

Ted Soqui, “The riots of 1992 in Los Angeles. A large building housing a swap meet mall on fire at 7th Street and Union Ave in Pico/Union area of Los Angeles. May 1, 1992” (© Ted Soqui, 1992, via caamuseum.org)

When: Wednesday, March 8, 7–9pm
Where: California African American Museum (600 State Drive, Exposition Park, Los Angeles)

More info here.

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