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Twice a year, students in the Vermont College of Fine Arts (VCFA)’s low-residency MFA in Visual Art gather on campus for residency—a vibrant and intense period of artistic discussion, critiques, lectures and exhibitions.

“The residency always feels like an artists’ congress to me. It brings together artists and researchers from the far corners of the United States and Canada,” shares program faculty co-chair, Dont Rhine. Visiting artists, guest speakers and an Artist-in-Residence also contribute to the breadth of perspectives represented on campus.

Central to the program, residencies are designed as a profound week of dialogue on various issues in contemporary theory, visual culture and art making. As a current student, Zachary Stephens explains, the residency is “ten days to… surround yourself with like minded people, engage in deep and meaningful conversation, and learn from talented academic and artist faculty and peers.”

“The MFA in Visual Art Residency is amazing. It’s a time to get to know yourself better, a time to make meaningful connections with other students, staff, and faculty. It’s a time to devote to your ideas, your goals and push your boundaries. Try something new, see new perspectives and challenge yourself. It’s a time for growth,” says current student Naomi Even-Aberle.

These exchanges are an essential part of what supports students’ semester projects outside of the residency and make the program a unique opportunity to explore and invest in their artistic practice.

The MFA in Visual Art program invites prospective students to visit VCFA’s campus and experience residency events, as well as meet with students, faculty, and alumni. The program offers free room and board during a prospective student’s stay. The residency is open to visitors July 24-27, 2017.

For more information about visiting the VCFA MFA in Visual Art summer residency, contact Thatiana Oliveira or call 866-934-8232, ext. 8636.

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