For the first time since 2019, the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design at the George Washington University hosted its end-of-year showcase, NEXT, in person this past spring. The capstone and thesis show displayed over 70 installations accompanied by live performances, bringing life and creativity back in person to the school’s historic Flagg Building after two years of virtual exhibitions.

Now, the public can view the NEXT 2022 installations and performances online, including a virtual walk through of the show.

Displayed works included projects by students in dance, exhibition design, fine arts, graphic design, new media photojournalism, social practice, and many more practices. Others — such as architecture, art history, decorative arts and design history, and music students — had the opportunity to showcase their work both online and at the NEXT Symposium preceding the exhibition.

This year’s show focused on issues of identity, race, gender, and accessibility, simultaneously celebrating the accomplishments of the 2022 graduating cohort and all of its successes to come. NEXT signifies the culmination of years worth of experimenting, learning, and diligent practice — some of the Corcoran’s core values.

Sprawling over two floors of the Flagg Building, the exhibition presented capstone photographs, paintings, videos, and interactive installations en masse. The Corcoran reopened its doors to the DC art community with an opening night reception, finally putting years of work and dedication on public display.

Though NEXT 2022 was on display in person for only three weeks, it remains readily accessible through online interaction. We invite you to explore our exhibition map, immersive virtual tour, and project descriptions. No matter what time of year, you can always revisit this exhibition through our online platform.

To learn more and virtually attend the show, visit next.corcoran.gwu.edu.

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