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Posted inOpinion

Ayn Rand’s Theory of Art

Did you know that Ayn Rand had a theory of art? No? Neither did I! But I discovered it recently, thanks to a tip from painter Abigail Markov. It’s encapsulated in the hefty 539-page treatise What Art Is: The Esthetic Theory of Ayn Rand, written and compiled by Louis Torres and Michelle Marder Kamhi. And while I didn’t buy the book — no, I couldn’t quite bring myself to do that — I did have a chance to read excerpted bits from the book as well as chapter summaries online. I’d like to share with you, dear reader, some of the key takeaways.

Posted inNews

Brooklyn Designer Held Without Bail for Hanging Plastic Bags from Trees

File this under WTF: Japanese Takeshi Miyakawa, who lives in Brooklyn, was arrested for hanging a plastic bag filled with LED lights from a tree in Greenpoint, and he’s now being held without bail for 30 days. Miyakawa’s installation of glowing “I Love NY” bags was meant as a tribute to the city, in celebration of Design Week, but when he left one in Williamsburg on Friday, the bomb squad was called in and all hell broke loose. Police arrested him later on charges of planting false bombs.

Posted inNews

Clowns of America Speechless at Koons Balloon Suit

The art world presents an overwhelming threat to clowns everywhere as Jeff Koons sues San Francisco store Park Life and Toronto creators imm Living for producing and selling balloon dog bookends that look only slightly similar to the famous artist’s balloon dog sculptures in that they both look like puffy dogs. A cease and desist letter from Koons commanded that the bookends no longer be sold and the objects are now removed from Park Life’s shelves. If Koons should succeed in his suit to have utter dominion over all the balloon dogs he surveys, we all know who would be hurt the most: clowns, America’s greatest balloon dog producers.

Posted inNews

Kiefer Protest Met With Conflict, But Not For Protesters

At Gagosian gallery on December 23rd, black-shirted figures stood in front of Anselm Kiefer’s enigmatic, monumental sculptures. Wearing shirts inscribed with “Next year in Jerusalem,” the protesters were attempting to continue Keifer’s political dialogue. Gallery employees didn’t agree and tried to force them out. Unfortunately, an innocent bystander got caught in the middle and was injured in the process, The New Yorker reports.