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Betye and Alison Saar, “House of Gris Gris” (1989), mixed-media installation, (via caamuseum.org, photo by Andreas Branch)

The Saars are a formidable artistic family spanning two generations whose works fearlessly examine issues of identity and culture. Working primarily in assemblage, Los Angeles-based artist Betye Saar has been creating challenging, often political works that interrogate assumptions about race and gender for 50 years, and at 90 she shows no signs of slowing down. Her daughter Alison Saar is a sculptor whose body-centered works capture the physical pain and spiritual resilience of the African diaspora. Their collaborative piece, “House of Gris Gris” (1989), is included in the exhibition Taking Place at the California African American Museum, which features African-American visions of home. It is also the jumping-off point for their mother-daughter conversation this Thursday, which will shed light on their familial path through the art world. RSVP is requested here or by calling 213-744-2024.

When: Thursday, February 16, 7–9pm
Where: California African American Museum (600 State Drive, Exposition Park, Los Angeles)

More info here.

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Matt Stromberg

Matt Stromberg is a freelance visual arts writer based in Los Angeles. In addition to Hyperallergic, he is a frequent contributor to Daily Serving, and Glasstire.