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Silent Night, Deadly Night (1984) (screenshot by the author via YouTube)” width=”1080″ height=”725″ srcset=”https://hyperallergic.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/deadly-night-nitehawk-1080×725.jpg 1080w, https://hyperallergic.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/deadly-night-nitehawk-720×483.jpg 720w, https://hyperallergic.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/deadly-night-nitehawk-360×242.jpg 360w, https://hyperallergic.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/deadly-night-nitehawk.jpg 1400w” sizes=”(max-width: 1080px) 100vw, 1080px”>

Still from Silent Night, Deadly Night (1984) (screenshot by the author via YouTube)

Whatever your stance on Christmas, there’s non-denominational fun to be had watching a campy 1980s film about a serial killer dressed as Santa Claus. Though it has become a cult classic, when Silent Night, Deadly Night opened in November, 1984, nobody thought it was funny or even fun. Families protested at theaters around the US and picketed its premiere, singing Christmas carols outside the cinema. Reviewing it on At the Movies, Gene Siskel addressed the filmmakers directly, concluding: “Your profits truly are blood money.” Shortly thereafter, the Christmas-themed horror movie, in which a deranged man in a Santa costume terrorizes a small town, was pulled from US theaters.

Nevertheless, Silent Night, Deadly Night is now considered a pillar of the Christmas horror genre, along with the likes of Black Christmas (1974), Christmas Evil (1980), and Don’t Open Till Christmas (1984). As a holiday gift, Williamsburg’s Nitehawk cinema will screen Silent Night, Deadly Night Friday and Saturday nights. Santa costume optional.

When: Friday, December 22 and Saturday, December 23 at 12:10am
Where: Nitehawk (136 Metropolitan Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn)

More info here.

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Benjamin Sutton

Benjamin Sutton is an art critic, journalist, and curator who lives in Park Slope, Brooklyn. His articles on public art, artist documentaries, the tedium of art fairs, James Franco's obsession with Cindy...