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Mutual Service Exercise, Anne Lukins and Netta Sadovsky, MFA ’19, digital still from video.

The Tyler School of Art is pleased to announce its annual MFA Thesis Exhibitions, the culmination of two years of intensive artistic and critical development for the school’s Master of Fine Arts candidates.

Tyler’s 2019 MFA Thesis Exhibitions showcase the work of 26 students representing nine MFA degree programs in flights of solo and collaborative shows from February 20 through April 13.

“We’re proud of what these students have accomplished,” said Tyler Associate Dean Chad Curtis. “Their work demonstrates expertise in their disciplines, but it also showcases a spirit of collaboration and a hunger to transcend boundaries into a more interdisciplinary practice. That’s an area of emphasis here at Tyler, and it’s gratifying to see it represented.”

When they graduate in May, Tyler’s MFA Class of 2019 will join an alumni community that includes some of the most influential artists, thinkers, and teachers of their time, including Judith K. Brodsky, MFA ’67; Angela Dufresne, MFA ’89; Anoka Faruqee, MFA ’97; Carl Fudge, MFA ’90; Trenton Doyle Hancock, MFA ’00; Edgar Heap of Birds, MFA ’79, Ree Morton, MFA ’70; Albert Paley, MFA ’69; and Erin M. Riley, MFA ’09.

The exhibitions will be installed at Tyler’s main building at Temple University in Philadelphia (12th and Norris streets). New exhibitions are up every Wednesday through Saturday, 11–6 pm, with receptions every Friday, 6–8 pm.

For more information and to see samples of participating students’ work and artist statements, visit tyler.edu/2019-mfa-exhibitions

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