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The Yale Center for British Art’s at home: Artists in Conversation brings together curators and artists to discuss various artistic practices and insights into their work. 

Artist, actress, director, and filmmaker Shirin Neshat was born near Tehran, Iran, in 1957. Now living and working in New York, she initially used photography to explore gender and its relation to the religious and cultural value systems of Islam. Subsequent video works turned to poetic imagery and narratives. Her first feature film, Women Without Men (2009), brings together the lives of four women amid Iran’s 1953 CIA-backed coup d’état. It received the Silver Lion Award for Best Director at the 66th Venice International Film Festival. Looking for Oum Kulthum (2017) follows an Iranian woman in exile and the consequences she faces in a conservative male-dominated society, while Land of Dreams (in production) is a political satire set in near-future America. 

In addition to her film work, Neshat directed her first opera, Aida, at the Salzburg Music Festival in Austria in 2017. She has been featured in numerous solo exhibitions at galleries and museums worldwide, including a major retrospective of her work, Shirin Neshat: I Will Greet The Sun Again, which is currently on view through May 16 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth following its run at The Broad, Los Angeles. Neshat is the recipient of the Golden Lion Award — the First International Prize — at the 48th Venice Biennial (1999), the Davos World Economic Forum’s Crystal Award (2014), and the Praemium Imperiale (2017). She is a critic in Photography at the Yale School of Art. 

This free conversation with Shirin Neshat will be live from noon to 1pm on Friday, April 23. To register, visit britishart.yale.edu.

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