Imagine a place where everything, even the very landscape, seems to be there in support of your best, deepest, and most exciting work ever. That place for me is Ucross.

Teresa Booth Brown, Ucross Fellow in Fall 2019

Ucross Foundation, the renowned artist residency program in northern Wyoming, is accepting applications for Spring 2023 through September 1.

Ucross’s general studio residencies are open to visual artists, writers, composers, choreographers, interdisciplinary artists, and performance artists, as well as collaborative teams. Ucross provides each fellow with a private studio, living accommodations, meals by a professional chef, a $1,000 stipend, and staff support.

The Ucross Fellowships for Native American Visual Artists and Writers represent the organization’s commitment to supporting contemporary Indigenous art and voices. In addition to the general residency benefits, Native American Fellows receive a $2,000 award, a waived application fee, and the opportunity to present work publicly.

We provide an unparalleled residency experience for artists. Our Fellows have described their time at Ucross as “life-changing,” “rare,” and “a simulation of a perfect world” for artists. We hope you apply to see for yourself.

William Belcher, Ucross President

Ucross residencies, which range from two to six weeks, are awarded to 100 artists each year. 10 artists are in residence at one time.

Since the first residencies were awarded in 1983, more than 2,500 artists have experienced Ucross. Distinguished Fellows include Annie Proulx, Terry Tempest Williams, Elizabeth Gilbert, Ann Patchett, Ricky Ian Gordon, Bill Morrison, Theaster Gates, and Tayari Jones. Recent National Book Award winners Susan Choi, Sigrid Nunez, and Sarah M. Broom have been residents, as have Pulitzer Prize winners Michael R. Jackson and Colson Whitehead; Emmy Award winner Billy Porter; and three-term United States Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.

Learn more and apply by Thursday, September 1 at ucrossfoundation.org.

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