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Unicorns, Ghosts, and a North Korean Past

CHICAGO — Last December, rumors about a North Korean unicorn lair circulated the internet. Word got out that an ancient Korean king once rode this mythical beast. But soon it was discovered that this “unicorn” was not an actual unicorn, but rather an English mistranslation of the word “unicorn.” According to a report on International Business Times, the animal was actually a “beast with a dragon’s head, a deer’s body, the tail of a cow, hooves and a mane.” Because North Korea is known in the US for mysteries like these, and because the internet loves to consume bizarre or “weird” news, headlines about the supposed mythical unicorn creature lived for a while in readers’ minds.

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Winning “Work of Art,” 1.5 Years Later

Kymia Nawabi took home first prize on season two of Bravo’s Work of Art: The Next Great Artist, taking home $100,000 and a solo exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. On the final episode of Work of Art, she organized her works in a presentation entitled Not for Long, My Forlorn, a series of drawings that acted as meditations on life and death channeled through ravenous, otherworldly beings and animals that inhabit a purgatory-like space.

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A Print Outpost for America’s Overlooked Art Metropolises

CHICAGO — The idea of a city-specific annual art magazine available only in a tightly bound assortment of chunky-thick pages, glossy front-and-back covers, and near-cardstock paper is the antithesis of what we at Hyperallergic present to you, dear reader. In a world of increasingly networked experiences — where we read stories online and and “meet” lots of people only to know them by their Facebook selfies — there is less physical detritus left behind. But Manya K. Rubeinstein and Pete Oyler’s Outpost Journal longs to put the real ink back into print.

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Uncanny Twinism: Exploring Twins in Visual Art

CHICAGO — Twins are fascinating. Identical twins embody the visual doubling of a single human, which often calls to mind ideas of cloning. The psychic component of twins suggests that one can complete the other’s thoughts, that they feel the same thing and that, in effect, they are one single human being in two separate bodies.

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A Place to Rest Your Internet-Weary Head

CHICAGO — When I was but a wee young twin, a powerful psychic told me that I should keep a dream journal. I never forgot that moment, because it came to me in a dream during a wonderful evening of REM-induced magic. That psychic reappeared to me one day in the form of the tumblr blog tag #psychic moment. And that’s when I knew the Internet was haunting me.

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Learning to Love Your Image: Fan Art Meets Contemporary Art

CHICAGO — Anyone who has ever spent more than three consecutive hours listening to their favorite band on repeat, attempted to dress up as the lead singer, or camped out overnight to get tickets has more than just a passing interest in said band. This person, a bit fanatical in their behaviors and emotional connection with the band, is a fan. Many of these fans also happen to be artists, who are either making art about their obsessions or have “grown up” and stopped indulging in their teenage-scented fantasies.

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A Space Where Identity Politics Give Way to Queer Minimalism

What happened to the glitter, the queer ideals, the mirror that looks back at the viewer? In Aay Preston-Myint’s artwork, politically charged objects are emptied of their significance. In his solo exhibition (At Night, I Think of You), now on view at Threewalls gallery, sculpture, sound and photographic pieces become abstracted, minimalist works, harkening back to older forms.

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A Green Screen Mirrors the Impossibilities of Arrival

Somewhere in Los Angeles, a movie is being filmed, an actor is speaking words from memory, and a person is hunched over a screen carefully editing moving images using the green screen, a post-production special effects technique that layers on a background that doesn’t physically exist. The conceptual premise of the green screen is the entry point for Kelly Kaczynski’s solo exhibition Here On The Way There, on view through May 26 at Comfort Station in Chicago’s Logan Square neighborhood.