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The First Known Printed Bookplate

Dating to 1480, the oldest known printed bookplate is part of a centuries-long history of personalization by book lovers.

Unknown artist, bookplate for Hilprand Brandenburg of Biberach‚Ä®, woodcut, black printing ink, and hand coloring on paper (Germany, 1480). Bookplate is in Jacobus de Voragine’s Sermones quadragesimales (Bopfingen, W√ľrttemberg, 1408), on view in The Art of Ownership at the Rosenbach Museum and Library (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

In a series for the first day of each month, Hyperallergic is exploring some firsts in art, from the earliest known depictions of things to pioneers in the visual fields.

PHILADELPHIA ‚ÄĒ The first known bibliophile¬†to adorn his collection with the personal touch of a bookplate is¬†Hilprand Brandenburg of Biberach‚Ä®. The 1480 woodcut print, on view in¬†The Art of Ownership: Bookplates and Book Collectors from 1480 to the Present¬†at the¬†Rosenbach Museum and Library in Philadelphia, depicts an angel holding a shield emblazoned¬†with an ox.¬†Details of the seraphic wings are hand-colored in red and green, with the angel’s cloak, flowing as if in flight, given a rosy hue. The Rosenbach states that this is¬†the “oldest known printed bookplate in the western world.”

Unknown artist, bookplate for Hilprand Brandenburg of Biberach‚Ä®, woodcut, black printing ink, and hand coloring on paper (Germany, 1480). Bookplate is in Jacobus de Voragine’s Sermones quadragesimales (Bopfingen, W√ľrttemberg, 1408) (courtesy Rosenbach Museum & Library)

When the scholarly priest Hilprand Brandenburg included these bookplates in the over 450 volumes he bestowed on the Carthusian monastery at Buxheim near Memmingen, Germany, woodblock printing had just recently been invented. As The Art of Ownership demonstrates in its five centuries of designs, bookplates often used innovative publishing techniques, from engravings to lithographs.

The 1480 Hilprand bookplate displayed in the one-room show is¬†not the sole¬†surviving example¬†(there is¬†one at the New York Public Library, for instance).¬†Yet contained within Hilprand’s copy of¬†Jacobus de Voragine’s 1408¬†Sermones quadragesimales,¬†it further¬†reveals¬†something incredibly valuable about bookplates: provenance.

Curated by¬†Alex L. Ames, The Art of Ownership features numerous¬†bookplates still attached to their original books, conveying¬†the progression of ownership and details about the lives of collectors. The art of the “ex libris,” as bookplates are also¬†called¬†(meaning “from the books of” in Latin) evolved from earlier forms of marking book ownership, such as¬†medieval book curses¬†that warned against theft, or simply¬†handwritten names. The objects¬†in The Art of Ownership are from¬†the Rosenbach’s collections, the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia (an institution of which the Rosenbach¬†is a part), the University of Delaware‚Äôs William Augustus Brewer Bookplate Collection, and other area¬†repositories. Thus the focus is¬†on American and European bookplates, although¬†they were used around¬†world. At¬†the Metropolitan Museum of Art, there is Shah Jahan’s 1645 bookplate¬†with intricate Mughal-style embellishments in¬†gold.

Sidney Lawton Smith, design for the bookplate of Amy Gertrude Smith (Boston Athenaeum, reproduction) (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)
Unknown artist, bookpalte of Jacob Solis-Cohen, engraved print and black printing ink on paper United States, late 19th or early 20th century. Bookplate is in George Pinckard’s Notes on the West Indies …. (London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1806) (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

Many of the earliest bookplates from the¬†15th and 16th centuries are “armorial bookplates,” depicting coats of arms, since¬†private book ownership at this time was the domain of the wealthy. Bookplates really took off in popularity with the mass production of books in the 19th century, their¬†heyday continuing up to the 1940s. The Art of Ownership¬†features¬†work by renowned illustrators like Walter Crane¬†and Aubrey Beardsley, as well as bookplates¬†from the libraries of Charlie Chaplin, Eleanor¬†Roosevelt, and Walt Disney.

We know a lot about, say, Chaplin, but sometimes¬†the¬†biographical visuals of a bookplate may be the only remaining¬†information about a person’s life, and their personal libraries, often now disassembled. One for¬†Frank Brewer Bemis from 1925 is inside a 1620 edition¬†of¬†Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra’s Don Quixote. Illustrated by Sidney Lawton Smith, it shows Bemis’s home¬†library in attentive¬†detail, down to the book shelves with their glass doors. Another¬†in the Boston-printed book¬†The Christians exercise by Satans temptations¬†belonged to Hannah Sutton, the date of 1701 giving rare insight into the reading of American women in the early 18th century.¬†From Hilprand Brandenburg with his sacred tomes, to these small portals to¬†the past, bookplates are a gateway to individual readers in¬†the history of literature.

Walter Crane, designer, and John Angel James Wilcox, engraver, bookplate for Harry Elkins Widener, engraved print on paper (London and Boston, 1908). The bookplate is in Robert Saunders, A catalogue of the library … of David Garrick, Esq (London, 1823) (courtesy Rosenbach Museum & Library)
1945 bookplate of William Dixcy Shellenberger, which the medical professional also used on his microscope (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)
Jack Butler Yeats, bookplate for John Quinn, ‚Ä®wood engraving and black printing ink on paper (Ireland, late 19th or early 20th century). The bookplate is in William Michael Rossetti’s Fine art, chiefly contemporary (London, Macmillan, 1867) (courtesy Rosenbach Museum & Library)
Unknown artist, bookplate for Thomas Keppel, Earl of Albemarle, engraved and etched print and black printing ink on paper (London, after 1754). Bookplate is in Exercise for the horse, dragoon, and foot forces (Dublin, printed by Andrew Crooke, 1728) (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)
Sidney Lawton Smith, bookplate for Frank Brewer Bemis, ‚Ä®engraved and photomechanical process print on paper (Boston, 1925). Bookplate is in‚Ä® Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra’s The history of Don Quichote …. (London, 1620) (courtesy Rosenbach Museum & Library)
Edwin Davis French, bookplate of William Keeney Bixby, ‚Ä®engraved print and black printing ink on paper (New York, 1906). Bookplate is in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The scarlet letter: a romance … (Boston, Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1850) (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)
Unknown artist, bookplate for Dr. Stoughton R. Vogel‚Ä®, etched print and black and brown printing ink on paper.‚Ä® Bookplate is in Benjamin Heath Malkin’s A father‚Äôs memoirs of his child (London, Longman, Hurst, Rees, and ‚Ä®Orme, 1806) (courtesy Rosenbach Museum & Library)
Unknown artist, bookplate for Hilprand Brandenburg of Biberach‚Ä®, woodcut, black printing ink, and hand coloring on paper (Germany, 1480). Bookplate is in Jacobus de Voragine’s Sermones quadragesimales (Bopfingen, W√ľrttemberg, 1408), on view in The Art of Ownership at the Rosenbach Museum and Library (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

The Art of Ownership: Bookplates and Book Collectors from 1480 to the Present continues at the Rosenbach Museum and Library (2008‚Äď2010 Delancey Place, Philadelphia) through March 19.

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