The BMC Prize, an annual grant of $20,000, celebrates the lasting impact of Black Mountain College in contemporary arts. Dubai-based interdisciplinary artists Ramin Haerizadeh, Rokni Haerizadeh, and Hesam Rahmanian will have the opportunity to develop their practice in a context that is rich with artistic and cultural significance and ongoing contemporary relevance.

Over the past few decades, Ramin, Rokni, and Hesam have shared a life philosophy that has allowed for mutual creation, during which their individual practices interact with their collaborative ones and which is informed by the understanding and technical skills of other people. From the dialogues they build among themselves and with other artists, friends, and collaborators, these artists have established a personal language that enables them to present different layers of content and texture in their work.

Origins of the Prize
Black Mountain College (BMC) was a uniquely global college, with ideas and ideals grounded in worldviews that extend beyond the Western canon. In the same way, the legacy of the college has taken root across the globe, evolving and expanding to encompass disparate identities and forms of expression. Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center (BMCM+AC) is dedicated to preserving the history of BMC as well as facilitating new work through collaboration with contemporary artists. As they advance this mission they look to a blueprint set forth by BMC that valued the greater good, experimentation, and accountability.

Funded by cultural pollinators Hedy Fischer and Randy Shull, the BMC Prize will allow BMCM+AC to continue on this path by building relationships and creating an impact with intention by supporting the creation of new work by the most innovative artists working within the BMC tradition today. The BMC Prize reflects the spirit of Black Mountain College as a place conducive to experimentation, where global social movements, communitarian efforts, and process-based practice flourished.

For more information, visit blackmountaincollege.org.

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