The Savannah College of Art and Design proudly announces the appointment of Daniel S. Palmer as the new chief curator of the SCAD Museum of Art, just in time for the teaching museum’s 10th-anniversary celebration.

“Daniel Palmer is a prolific curator who brings to SCAD MOA a wealth of knowledge and experience and a dedication to representation, amplifying the voices and impact of international artists,” said Kari Herrin, executive director of SCAD museums and exhibitions. “As we usher in an exciting second decade, Daniel will be an inspiring curatorial and programming leader who will move the museum forward with vision and tenacity.”

Prior to joining SCAD MOA, Palmer was curator at Public Art Fund, New York, where he led an ambitious program of exhibitions featuring work by artists such as Melvin Edwards, Awol Erizku, Carmen Herrera, Harold Ancart, Tony Oursler, and Liz Glynn, among others. He has previously held curatorial positions at the Jewish Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

“I’m thrilled to join the SCAD Museum of Art as chief curator,” said Palmer. “It’s an honor to continue this dynamic institution’s mission of bringing emerging and eminent artists to inspire students and the community at a pioneering university like SCAD. I look forward to leading the museum’s superb team as we encourage creativity and spark dialogue in idyllic Savannah. I’d like to express my gratitude to all the incredible artists, colleagues, and friends I’ve had the privilege of working with over the years for their support. I look forward to many new collaborations as I enter this new chapter.”

Palmer joins a highly accomplished curatorial team at SCAD MOA, which recently opened new exhibitions by internationally-celebrated artists Katharina Grosse, Barthélémy Toguo, and Doreen Lynette Garner, among others, as part of the university’s 13th annual SCAD deFINE ART signature series of conversations and curated experiences with vital voices in art and design.

To learn more, visit scadmoa.org.

The Latest

Required Reading

This week, Godard’s anti-imperialism, in defense of “bad” curating, an inexplicable statue, criminalizing culture wars, and more.